The 3rd Narrative of School Reform with Will Richardson

will richardson“It’s no longer about what WE want students to do. We need to ask ourselves ‘How do we support kids in what THEY want to do?'”

Will Richardson is a parent of two teen-agers, and has spent the last dozen years developing an international reputation as a leading thinker and writer about the intersection of social online learning networks and education. Will has authored four books, most recently Why School?: How Education Must Change When Learning and Information Are Everywhere (Kindle Single)
– which was published by TED books and based on his most recent TEDx talk in Melbourne, Australia.

“We need to do inquiry based, student centered, technology rich learning in an effort to prepare kids to go out into the real world so they can continually learn, connect and create with other people.”

WATCH HERE:

Noteworthy moments you should pay attention to:

4:05 – A teacher’s role will be more difficult in the short term due to limitations from the idea of “Doing school better”. However, this is a very exciting moment for learning. It’s a time to use technology for both teachers and students to develop new learning patterns.

6:40 – We’re looking at the wrong measures in school!

7:20 – Teachers need to become more connected learners. 2 big questions that should be addressed: “How do you connect to other people?” and “How do you create with computer?”. There’s a lot of emphasis here on learning how to join the right communities, and provide value to these learning communities.

9:45 – Twitter is your launching pad for this movement towards connected learning.

10:05 – Jackie discusses her point of view on teacher agency. There are a lot of choices out there, but also a lot of restrictions. What can teachers do? Stand up for your freedom as an educator, and become a connected learner!

10:50 – According to Will these are some good, hard questions that you should ask of your communities so you can make your own classroom better.

14:03 – The third narrative of school reform: Focus on “How do we support kids in what they want to do? We learn by doing things that we care about, and that we want to learn more about… We need to do inquiry based, student centered, technology rich learning in an effort to prepare kids to go out into the real world so they can continually learn and continually connect and create with other people.”

Mentions of Technology

– Twitter 

– Worpress.com and Tumblr.com

You can reach Will Richardson on Twitter @willrich45 and on his website.
Here is Will’s TedX Talk in Australia
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Education Quote of the Day – Maria Montessori

montessori

“Scientific observation has established that education is not what the teacher gives; education is a natural process spontaneously carried out by the human individual, and is acquired not by listening to words but by experiences in the environment.

The task of the teacher becomes that of preparing a series of motives of cultural activity, spread over a specially prepared environment, and then refraining from obtrusive interference.” – Maria Montessori

Read more here

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Closing out 2013 – Ten Most Popular Education Videos This Year

As we wave goodbye to 2013 and welcome 2014 with open arms, let’s take a look at the top educational videos on YouTube this year.

How did we judge “Top Videos? By views of course!

This video “Which Came First – The Chicken or the Egg” by AsapSCIENCE has seen over 13 million views.

What have we learned from these?

First of all, video is an extremely powerful medium that can educate millions of people for free!
And, video is most powerful when kept short. 70% of the videos listed here are less than 6 minutes long! Let that be a lesson to us all.

Have a Happy New Year and enjoy the other 9 most popular videos this year: http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/12/ten-most-popular-educational-youtube-videos-in-2013/

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The Flipped Classroom Model on StudySoup (Infographic)

In a world where education is being turned on it’s head, StudySoup strives to keep you ahead of the curve with awesome functionality for your students. We’re excited to inform you that teachers around the US are now using StudySoup to provide the Flipped Classroom for their students. What does that even mean? Allow us to explain here:

Think about this – giving lectures in class isn’t the best use of your time, right? Some students are taking notes, some are playing games, and others are chatting. What if you could record your lecture, and send students home to watch the lecture? Now students can watch your lecture on their own time, rewind if they missed something or play games without distracting peers. Better yet, you won’t have to repeat your exact lecture semester after semester. Instead, you can use classroom time assign work, answer questions and engage your students at a much higher and personal level.

Where does StudySoup come in? You need a delivery vehicle for you lectures, readings and homework. We provide the complete delivery platform for your materials, and you can even make some money selling your course! Just take 2 minutes to upload your videos, text and powerpoint presentation, set a price (or make it free) – and Enjoy 🙂

Here is an awesome infographic about the Flipped Classroom from our friends at Knewton Learning.

Flipped Classroom

Created by Knewton and Column Five Media

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Flipped Classroom: Mastery Learning

The most common teaching method today is to break down the macro – the course in its entirety – into smaller, easily digestible portions – lessons – and design a logical flow from one day to the next. To measure the effectiveness of a particular lesson, teachers typically grasp students’ understanding by assigning and grading homework. When a student performs poorly on a homework assignment, teachers reasonably assume that they’re not getting it. The student is perhaps lazy. Or slow. Alas, you can’t stall the whole class on account a few stragglers. And, of course, data doesn’t lie.

This week, Tina Rosenberg wrote a short piece for New York Times’ Opinionator re-introducing the concept of mastery learning, especially as it relates to the flipped classroom. Though not a new idea, as with many alternative learning methods it has been all but blown over by the current public schooling model, one born from America’s once deified drive toward industrialization. In effect, the system tended to treat schools as a machine-like operative – put uneducated youngsters in, out pops a competent class of workers and citizens. In assembly-line fashion, every student learned the same courses, took the same tests, and was measured by the same yardstick of intelligence.

Unlike the traditional model, mastery learning humanizes the student. We’ve come to recognize that people learn at different paces and in different ways – so why would force them through the same static system? Even teachers who recognize this must follow their lesson plan. Stragglers, unfortunately, are left in the dust. I’m not going to reiterate Rosenberg’s points because she makes them so well, but highly recommend her article.

What is relevant for ed-tech is that, in a flipped classroom, the student takes the “lesson” home. Homework, on the other hand, is done in class, with the teacher actively engaging and helping students understand solutions. As with the traditional model, the take-home lesson can contain readings, examples, and breakdowns of key concepts. But unlike assigned homework, where the student must produce, on their own, some demonstration of their knowledge, the take-home lesson does not force output – instead, the focus is on input. At home, students should feel no pressure to produce – they should be given the opportunity to develop genuine curiosity in the subject. Teachers need tools to create a variety of course content and offer lessons that can suit a variety of students.

Another aspect we strongly believe in is a fair educator’s community. No one is better at making the mundane appear fascinating than teachers discussing their trade – I’ve gotten into debates with my high school chemistry teacher about the minutiae of electron valence (not something that, in itself, rarely gets me excited) and felt as if we were exploring the world’s most fascinating structures. As teachers begin to populate the internet with unique and powerful course content, it is vital that their work can be shared with others, and that they have the opportunity to be adequately compensated for it.

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Introducing: StudySoup’s Flipped Classroom Week

Although seemingly static, the education industry is constantly adopting new classroom models.

In the 19th century, America’s first classrooms operated with a degree of prudence that reflected the country’s fledgling government and limited resources – locally-sourced wood for the schoolhouse, teachers hired from the clergy, and bookshelves comprised of whatever was available. As the population largely lived in rural areas, schools were a direct responsibility of their local community. By the 21st century, however, the scope of American public schools had dramatically expanded: centralized government regulation, teachers competing for jobs, and textbooks from around the world.

Today, education is experiencing yet another transformation: the digital age.

Before starting StudySoup, I was intimately aware of the the impact that technology was having on the classroom, with the increasing popularity of Powerpoint presentations, course information stored online, and of course, students using computers in class. But despite these incremental changes, no single advent had fully remodeled the modern classroom to adequately fit this generation of students. Then I discovered the Flipped Classroom model. (See infographic below)

StudySoup strives to keep you ahead of the curve with tools to build a virtual classroom to perfectly complement your course and provide awesome functionality for your students. We’re excited to share with you that teachers around the US are now using StudySoup to carry out the Flipped Classroom for their students.

Where does StudySoup come in? Teachers and professors need a delivery vehicle for lectures, readings, and homework. We provide a complete delivery platform for your materials. In addition, we’re helping facilitate the next expansion of education: teachers can sell their courses through the Education Marketplace and earn additional compensation for their work. We believe in simple site functionality so you’re not wasting time fiddling with technology – you’re using it to your advantage. It takes just 2 minutes to upload your videos, text, and presentations.

With a virtual classroom that works on your terms, you have more classroom time to discuss concepts, answer questions, and engage students in a much more personal and attentive manner.

Take a look at this awesome infographic, courtesy of our friends at Knewton Learning.
Flipped Classroom

Created by Knewton and Column Five Media

Note: This is the 1st entry in StudySoup’s Flipped Classroom Week. Stay tuned for next week’s updates!

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